Digital Game Based Learning (DGBL)- I

Learning Thru Play

In Child Psychology the term learning thru play is most important and very effective way of learning and educating the children. Play is recreation, amusement, or fun. It helps children to learn certain subject, historical events or culture, expands concepts and reinforced development. This also applicable to the adults. The president of the American Association for the Child’s Right to Play and professor at Hofstra University, Dr. Rhonda Clements, says, “It is important to maintain a healthy sense of play throughout childhood and into adulthood. Our complex society requires clear thinkers, playful attitudes, humor and creativity for complex problem solving.” Not only does play help children grow and develop as as well as begin a lifelong love of learning, but the healthy play that you support  today helps prepare children for the world that they will work, play, and learn in as adults. Now in days playing thru learning is not only limited with the toys or physical(outdoor sports) activity, It includes digital gaming devices, like Mobile phones, video game player and Tablets etc.

What is Game-Based Learning ?

Game- Based Learning is a type of game play that has defined learning outcomes. Generally, game based learning is designed to balance subject matter with gameplay and the ability of the player to retain and apply said subject matter to the real world.

 To progress in a game is to learn; when we are actively engaged with a game, our minds are experiencing the pleasure of grappling with (and coming to understand) a new system. This is true whether the game is considered “entertainment” (e.g., World of Warcraft) or “serious” (e.g., an FAA-approved flight simulator).

The implications of delivering game experiences for education and training are enormous. In the US, nearly 170 million people played computer and videogames in 2008 , spending a record $11.7 billion . Harness the power of well-designed games to achieve specific learning goals, and the result is a workforce of highly motivated learners who avidly engage with and practice applying problem-solving skills. Because of good game design, more than 11 million subscribers spend an average of 23 hours per week immersed in World of Warcraft. A growing core of game-based learning experts use the same design principles to make it compelling for surgical students to practice and hone proper laparoscopic techniques on a virtual patient , or inspire first responders to frequently rehearse and sharpen their training in a simulated hazardous materials emergency .

Game-based Learning vs. Traditional Training

Well-designed game-based learning has several advantages over traditional experiential learning methods. It is cost-effective and low-risk (unlike, for example, safety training using live machinery). Perhaps even more important, there are significant learning advantages. Learners can re-enact a precise set of circumstances multiple times, exploring the consequences of different actions. In addition, well-designed games permit learning experiences that aren’t possible in real life—for example, “designing” a dolphin to find out how body size and fin position affect how far it can swim , or deliberately causing the biggest possible virtual explosion to understand why gas line disasters happen.

Figure one compares three approaches: passive training methods such as classroom lectures and online “click through” tutorials; hands-on training such as apprenticeship programs; and game-based learning.

 

Traditional Training (lectures, online tutorials)

Hands-on Training

Game-based Learning

Cost-effective

X

X

Low physical risk/liability

X

X

Standardized assessments allowing student-to-student comparisons

X

X

Highly engaging

X

X

Learning pace tailored to individual student

X

X

Immediate feedback in response to student mistakes

X

X

Student can easily transfer learning to real-world environment

X

X

Learner is actively engaged

X

X

Fig. 1: Comparison of Traditional Training, Hands-on, and Game-based Learning

Carnegie Mellon’s Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence has amassed a set of basic principles that describe the learning process . Following are four of these key principles, with examples of how each plays out in traditional training and in game-based learning.

Principle 1: Students’ prior knowledge can help or hinder learning.

Principle 2: Students’ motivation determines, directs and sustains what they do to learn.

Principle 3: To develop mastery, students must acquire component skills, practice integrating them, and know when to apply what they have learned.

Principle 4: Goal-directed practice coupled with targeted feedback enhances the quality of students’ learning.